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Christopher Shays

Christopher Shays

If you would like to get insight into one of Connecticut’s most successful and controversial congressmen, join us for a discussion with former U.S. Representative Christopher Shays on Tuesday, April 7 at 5:00pm.

Represenative Shays spent 21 years in congress as a moderate Republican, often clashing with his own party on his social views. His entire career is a story of how politicians can successfully stay true to themselves and their issues.

Effective March 30th, the John McDonald Reading Room at the Dodd Research Center will be open from Noon until 4pm, Monday through Friday. While this means less hours to access our collections in the reading room, our commitment to serve our patrons has not diminished. Our curators are still available to offer instruction sessions, assistance with class projects and individual research consultations. And don’t forget, we offer a wide range of online resources which are at your disposal 24 hours a day!

Our exhibit galleries are also not affected by this change, they are still availble for your viewing from 8:30am-4:30pm Monday through Friday.

Professor Adam Fairclough
Professor Adam Fairclough, the Sackler Chair in U.S. History at Leiden University in the Netherlands will be giving the Spring 2009 Raymond and Beverly Sackler Distinguished Lecture in Human Rights on

Tuesday, March 31, 2009
4:00pm, Konover Auditorium

Professor Fairclough’s first book, To Redeem the Soul of America: The Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Martin Luther King, Jr. (1987) won an Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights. Race and Democracy: The Civil Rights Struggle in Louisiana , 1915-1972 (1995) was the recipient of the Louisiana Literary Award, the L. Kemper Williams Prize for the best book in Louisiana history, and the Lillian Smith Book Award of the Southern Regional Council. His most recent book, A Class of Their Own: Black Teachers in the Segregated South won the 2008 Outstanding Book Award of the History of Education Society

Join us as we welcome one of the leading scholars in the study of the American Civil Rights Movement.

March 20, 1960

March 20, 1960

Even the most dedicated authors get a bit of “spring fever”. Edwin Way Teale, who devoted his life to nature and the environment, shows signs in his diary that he is thankful for spring to arrive during his first spring at “Trial Wood”, the newly purchased seventy-nine acre property he and his wife Nellie purchased in Hampton, CT.

We drive to Willimantic for Sunday papers – walk in woods and down lane to see pussywillow tree in the afternoon.”

He further states that he should be working on Chapter XXI (of “Journey Into Summer”) but “seem to have spring fever!”

(in the interest of full disclosure, we should also let you know that 6 days later on March 26, it was 0 degrees at dawn) Enjoy Spring!

Sunday Benches, Sillamae

Sunday Benches, Sillamae


Artist Sara Rhodin will present a gallery talk and lecture on Tuesday, March 24, at 4 p.m., in the Konover Auditorium with a reception to follow. The exhibit, titled “Transitional Spaces in Post-Soviet Estonia” is on display in the Dodd Center West Hallway Gallery through April 20.

Ms. Rhodin was a Fulbright Scholar in Estonia in 2006/2007 and a New York Times intern in Moscow in 2008. She is currently a graduate student in Russian and East European studies at Harvard University.

Sponsored by the Office of International Affairs, European Studies, and the Human Rights Institute.

For those that keep honey bees, or enjoy reading about those that do, this season of thaw and mud is a busy one spent studying, observing, and nourishing healthy bee activity. And as we learn, much remains unknown about the wonderful world of bees. The latest addition to the large collection of historic books, pamphlets and periodicals on beekeeping and apiculture at the Dodd Research Center is a set of unique, handwritten journals by Connecticut resident Charles Pease. “Charlie” as he was known, was born in 1866 and in 1923 moved his successful printing business to Canaan, where he lived most of life. A naturalist and advocate of self-sufficient homestead living, Charlie grew proficient in keeping bees and goats, educating others about his practices as well as the medical benefits of honey and goatsmilk. Charlie’s journals date from 1919 to 1949 and are a fascinatingly personal document of bee-keeping practices, hive behavior, seasonal observations, and inventiveness.

Charlie Pease's 1946 journal

Charlie Pease's 1946 journal

Charlie Pease's 1927 Journal

Charlie Pease's 1927 Journal

Sample the variety of imagery, designs and printmaking techniques available in the latest addition to the Dodd Research Center’s digital collections: bookplates!  These small artworks, produced to uniquely identify books with their owners and their libraries, illustrate etching, engraving, lithography and woodcut techniques of artists and printmakers from around the world.  The bookplates collection is a component of a large collection of resources that document Ex Libris and the book arts available at the Dodd Center.  Browse over 300 images represented in the digital collection currently.  Additions will follow in the coming months.

Ex Libris Collection, Archives and Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries

Bookplate by Gerard Gaudaen for Lou Asperslag

The earliest photographs of UConn, held at the Dodd Research Center, were made by Harry L. Garrigus, UConn class of 1897 and instructor of animal husbandry. 500 of his glass plates dating from the late 1890s are now available online through UConn Libraries’ Digital Mosaic.  To browse the collection, select the Garrigus Photograph Collection and search.  UConn’s agricultural heyday and growth are documented, as well as early administrators, staff and townspeople.  We’re adding new images weekly, so check back with us for more.

Judging sheep, 1912

Judging sheep, 1912

Fruit trees near poultry buildings, 1897-1912

Fruit trees near poultry buildings, 1897-1912

Glass plate negative

Glass plate negative

Dodd Center’s Tweets